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Franklin Mint
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WORLS WAR TWO SCALE MODEL COLLECTIBLES AT FRANKLIN MINT
World War Two Bombers And Fighters Scale Models From The Franklin Mint
Franklin Mint
Forzieri.com / Firenze Seta srl
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C-47A Dakota Transport Model World War Two Aircraft From Franklin Mint
Douglas C-47A  Dakota Transport Scale Model Aircraft
Part Number: B11C971
Availability: Available Now
Approximately 16 3/4" (42.6 cm) in length. Wingspan approximately 23 3/4" (60.3 cm). Scale 1:48.

Douglas C-47A  Dakota Transport Scale Model Aircraft - Description
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Crucial to victory and significant to history, the Douglas C-47A Transport was adapted from a commercial airliner, and proved to be the most enduring American aircraft of World War II.
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Its power, heft, and longevity inspired Dwight D. Eisenhower to declare it “one of the most vital pieces of military equipment used in winning the war.”
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Carrying up to 6,000 pounds of cargo, including troops and vehicles, the C-47A was an invaluable mission tool for attack and reconnaissance.

The C-47, perhaps the best known military transport of all time, was neither the largest, the fastest, nor the most beautiful but it must have been the best loved and hardest worked. More than 10,000 of the C-47s - a beefed-up, military version of the DC-3 - served the U.S. Army Air Forces, the U.S. Navy and our allies.
This was the military version of the Douglas DC-3 passenger liner. It was best known as the "Dakota". The C-47 was one of the most succesfull aircraft ever, and praised by General Eisenhower amongst the most important instruments of victory in WWII. It carried supplies in all of the theaters of conflict in WWII. It was used as a troop transport and glider tug during the invasion of Europe and it kept the Allied forces in China supplied by carrying supplies "Over the Hump" of the Himalaya Mtns from India to China. More than 13,300 of the DC-3 in all its forms were built -- this included Japanese and Soviet production. It first flew in 1941, many are still being used today. It last saw action in the Vietnam War as a gunship called "Puff the Magic Dragon", firing machine guns and cannons from it's windows for enemy troop suppression. The Canadian Air Force mothballed it's last DC-3 in 1988.
The military career of the Douglas DC series began in 1936 when the Army Air Corps ordered a pair of DC-2s under the designation C-32. A contract followed for 18 DC-2s in the C-33 freighter configuration and two more as C-34 staff transports. Then, in 1937, the Army ordered a plane built to its own specifications. It was a hybrid design that combined the fuselage of the DC-2 with a DC-3 tail. This was the sole C-38 prototype and it led to 35 production versions called the C-39. The C-39 represented the first serious effort by the Army to establish an airlift capability.
By 1941 the old Air Corps had been transformed into the Army Air Forces, and it selected a modified version of the DC-3 -- the C-47 Skytrain -- to become its standard transport aircraft. A reinforced fuselage floor and the addition of a large cargo door were the only major modifications. Other changes included the fitting of cargo hooks beneath the center wing section and the removal of the tail cone to mount a hook for towing gliders.
As a supply plane, the C-47 could carry up to 6,000 pounds of cargo. It could also hold a fully assembled jeep or a 37 mm cannon. As a troop transport, it carried 28 soldiers in full combat gear. As a medical airlift plane, it could accommodate 14 stretcher patients and three nurses. Seven basic versions were built, and the aircraft was given at least 22 designations, including the AC-47D gunship, the EC-47 electronic reconnaissance aircraft, the EC-47Q antiaircraft systems evaluation aircraft and the C-53 Skytrooper.
Every branch of the U.S military and all the major allied powers flew it. The U.S. Navy version was the R4D. The British and the Australians designated it the Dakota (a clever acronym composed of the letters DACoTA for Douglas Aircraft Company Transport Aircraft). The aircraft operated from every continent in the world and participated in every major battle. By the end of World War II, more than 10,000 had been built. For all of its official and unofficial names, it came to be known universally as the "Gooney Bird." General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe, termed it one of the most vital pieces of military equipment used in winning the war.
C-47s remained in active military service long after the end of World War II. They played a critical role in the 1948 Berlin Airlift and saw action in the Korean and Vietnam wars.
OUR SCALE MODEL WARBIRD PRICE ONLY $135.00
CLICK THE PICTURE TO ORDER THIS PLANE
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OUR SCALE MODEL WARBIRD PRICE ONLY $135.00
CLICK THE PICTURE TO ORDER THIS PLANE
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